I write programs for a living. I've got an opinion on everything. Unfortunately.
2872 stories
·
8 followers

Rogue One's CGI resurrection tech: how 'ghosting' will change Hollywood

1 Comment

Peter Cushing-style reappearances might soon be used to solve all kinds of problems, from Ben Affleck’s discomfort in the Batsuit to Benedict Cumberbatch’s busy schedule

It’s already possible to be in two places at once in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, as Benedict Cumberbatch proved during several out-of-body experiences in last year’s Doctor Strange. So the New York Post story that the Sherlock star has been replaced by a body double for the shooting of scenes as the sorcerer supreme in the forthcoming MCU instalment Avengers: Infinity War Part One should come as no shock. Moreover, with Rogue One: A Star Wars Story having shown you don’t even need to be alive to star in a new movie, we should hardly be surprised that an actor no longer has to be on set to get involved in a shoot.

Disney has denied that Cumberbatch’s performance will be superimposed over that of Broadway thesp Aaron Lazar, just as the late Peter Cushing’s features blanketed those of Holby City actor Guy Henry for Grand Moff Tarkin’s return in Gareth Edwards’ Rogue One. But the Post’s story reveals the brave new and rather scary world of ghosted performances that we now live in.

Continue reading...
Read the whole story
zippy72
4 hours ago
reply
Personally I'd ban this. No film using these techniques gets a rating.
FourSquare, qv
Share this story
Delete

The Bizarre History of LA’s Iconic Bradbury Building

1 Comment

From Blade Runner to the occult: the bizarre history of LA's iconic Bradbury Building(Image: Craig Dietrich; the Bradbury Building in downtown Los Angeles)

Even if you’ve never been to Los Angeles, California, you’ve probably seen the Bradbury Building. In addition to being used as the film location for a plethora of 1940s and ’50s-era film noir pieces, it also famously served as one of the major sets for the 1982 neo-noir sci-fi hit Blade Runner.

The history of how the iconic Bradbury Building (located at 304 South Broadway and West 3rd Street in downtown LA) came to be is appropriately bizarre. Curbed Los Angeles wrote of the Italian Renaissance Revival structure’s supposed origins back in 2015. We’ve summarised the weird occultist account here.

The Bradbury Building in downtown Los Angeles(Image: Highsmith, Carol. M)

In 1892, gold magnate turned real estate developer Lewis L. Bradbury asked local architect Sumner P. Hunt to design what Bradbury intended to be his crowning achievement. But the mogul didn’t like any of the plans that the architect presented to him, and instead approached Hunt’s draftsman, George Wyman, to make his vision a reality.

The Bradbury Building's bizarre history allegedly involves the occult and messages from the designers dead brother(Image: Thomas Amberg)

Wyman – who was not a trained architect – was offered the job. But not wanting to step on his boss’s toes, Wyman hesitated, and did what any level-headed wannabe architect would do under the circumstances. He consulted the spirit of his dead brother. Through a seance, the deceased relative allegedly advised Wyman to take the commission, reassuring him that the ambitious project would be a success.

The Bradbury Building in LA is said to have been designed by Sumner Hunt and/or George Wyman(Image: Luke Jones)

The draftsman did just that, and supposedly based his design on a popular science fiction novel by Edward Bellamy, called Looking Backwards: From 2000 to 1887. Published in 1888, the novel tells of a man who falls asleep and wakes in the year 2000 to find that America had been turned into a Socialist utopia. It’s fitting roots for a then highly-futuristic building that would become immortalised in one of the greatest sci-fi movies of all time.

Period photographs of Los Angeles' Italian Renaissance Revival Bradbury Building(Images: Jack Boucher – 1, 2)

If you enjoyed this article, don’t miss our earlier feature covering the 10 greatest fictional cities of film & literature.

The post The Bizarre History of LA’s Iconic Bradbury Building appeared first on Urban Ghosts Media.

Read the whole story
zippy72
7 hours ago
reply
Also features in The Artist :)
FourSquare, qv
Share this story
Delete

Another test post. Ignore it again

1 Comment

Test1

Read the whole story
zippy72
7 hours ago
reply
Duly ignored.
FourSquare, qv
Share this story
Delete

Preventing 2017 America from becoming like 1934 Germany: A watchlist

2 Comments and 4 Shares

In The New Yorker, Adam Gopnik has an excellent piece pointing out the true threats to U.S. democracy, which transcend partisan concerns. As patriotic Americans, can we recognize these threats, separately from policy outcomes we like or dislike? What bright-line events would be difficult to remedy by sitting passively until the next election?

He advises that policy concerns are simply normal politics:

Many programs and policies with which progressive-minded people passionately disagree will be put forward over the next few years. However much or strongly one opposes them, they are, like it or not, the actual agreed-on platform of a dominant national party….One may oppose these things—and one should, passionately and permanently—but they are in no sense illegitimate….They are also reversible by the same laws and rules and norms and judicial and, perhaps most of all, electoral processes that created them. If we want gun control, we need to get more people caring about it and more people in more places voting for it; we cannot complain because people who don’t want gun control don’t give it to us.

But, he continues, threats to American institutions are more serious.

Assaults on free speech; the imprisoning of critics and dissidents; attempts, on the Russian model, likely to begin soon, to intimidate critics of the regime with fake charges and conjured-up allegations; the intimidation and intolerance of even mild dissidence (that “Apologize!” tweet directed at members of the “Hamilton” cast who dared to politely petition Mike Pence); not to mention mass deportations or attempts at discrimination by religion—all things that the Trump and his cohorts have openly contemplated or even promised—are not part of the normal oscillations of power and policy. They are unprecedented and, history tells us, likely to be almost impossible to reverse.

These possibilities are reminiscent of my previous note, What Actions Are Shared To All Fascist Movements? I’ve been wondering what would be likely, bright-line indicators that institutions are collapsing. The depredations will be hard to keep up with, but it might be good to have a checklist before the inauguration.

  1. Taking sides with a foreign power against domestic opposition (this already happened, but is worth a re-mention).
  2. Detention of journalists.
  3. Loss of press access to the White House.
  4. Made-up charges against those who disagree with the government.
  5. Use of governmental power to target individual citizens for retribution.
  6. Use of a terrorist incident or an international incident to take away civil liberties.
  7. Persecution of an ethnic or religious minority, either by the Administration or its supporters.
  8. Defying the orders of courts, including the Supreme Court.

Some are listed by Gopnik. Can you think of more?

Of course, it is certainly possible that very few of these events will come to pass. That would be by far the best outcome. After all, Trump is a historically unpopular President-elect – the least popular in the history of modern polling.

However, it seems wise now to lay out a worst-case scenario, and be ready for it. As Gopnik says, it is time for the political left and right to make common cause:

So we need to stiffen our spines and broaden our embrace, grasp tightly but reach out far. The conservatives who see Trump for what he is and are shocked by it—and there are many, though not as many as there should be—should be welcomed….The best way to be sure that 2017 is not 1934 is to act as though it were. We must learn and relearn that age’s necessary lessons: that meek submission is the most short-sighted of policies; that waiting for the other, more vulnerable group to protest first will only increase the isolation of us all. We must refuse to think that if we play nice and don’t make trouble, our group won’t be harmed. Calm but consistent opposition shared by a broad front of committed and constitutionally-minded protesters—it’s easy to say, fiendishly hard to do, and necessary to accomplish if we are to save the beautiful music of American democracy.”

The right sidebar contains useful links that may help you in this regard.

Read the whole story
zippy72
21 hours ago
reply
Actually pretty much the opposite. Gun control laws were much stricter under the Weimar Republic, Hitler and co actually made owning a gun easier as time went on (so long as you weren't an "unreliable" person - i.e., Jewish)
FourSquare, qv
kazriko
1 day ago
reply
Wasn't gun control a plank of the national socialist party of Germany in the 1930's?
Colorado Plateau
Share this story
Delete

Try An Experiment With Photosynthesis

1 Comment

fakescience:

Try An Experiment With Photosynthesis

Read the whole story
zippy72
1 day ago
reply
Poor old Herbert...
FourSquare, qv
Share this story
Delete

#1284; In which Naught goes right

2 Shares

--inside the Gustafsons' bear. LONG story there.

Read the whole story
zippy72
1 day ago
reply
FourSquare, qv
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories